Paper, paper, everywhere
And there’s smudging of the ink
Paper, paper, everywhere
It’s time to change, you’d think.

Everybody wants your data. Each organisation has its own form they want completed. It’s time consuming and expensive for staff to do it, so they pass it off to the customer. It’s the modern way. The client does the work and you take the money.

In 2016 I started work at Lismore Base Hospital after moving from Royal North Shore Hospital in Sydney. Having been involved in teaching and education, particularly at the resident and registrar level, I was keen to get involved in a similar scene in Lismore. It didn’t take me long to track down my old supervisor from my time as a trainee registrar in Lismore, Dr Adam Blenkhorn, who had been evolving the Basic Physician Training  program over the years at Lismore. One of the key milestones he was keen to achieve was to run the national Physicians exam locally. This was no mean feat, but with the support of the new Department of Medicine, this aim is being achieved.

Dr Zewlan Moor

I remember reading in an interview with John Murtagh, the doyen of General Practice in Australia,  that he used to keep a list of all the masquerades up on the wall behind his patient’s head, so that he would not miss an important diagnosis. Once he had satisfied himself that he had excluded these and any other organic causes of the symptoms, he was free to sit with the patient and help them realise what it was that truly ailed them.

I do think that certain sorts of doctors get certain sorts of presentations. I have always been the sort who attracts psychosocial problems. That used to stress me, but now I’m trying to see it as my superpower. Indeed, I’m attempting to “lean in” to this superpower by opening a new private practice, called Byron Bibliotherapy.

The principles of secure communication using public key encryption were uncovered 40 years and have been implemented in medical communication in Australia for over 25 years.

The details of the process, asymmetric encryption, are well described and cryptography is an increasingly important area of computer science. Online explanations abound and vary from the very technical  to the overly simplified. The latter appearing trivially so at times.

Most end users merely want to know that their communication is secure and that the padlock in their browser or email client means something.

Canberra has released a 10-year plan to make Australian sport cleaner and more competitive, and to reduce the population’s inactivity by 15 per cent. Robin Osborne runs through the National Sport Plan known as “Sport 2030”.

In late July the Federal government launched the 71-page “Sport 2030” roadmap for how sport and physical activity might best be planned and administered over the next decade.  Perhaps unsurprisingly, most media focus was on strategies aimed at achieving sporting excellence (gaining more Olympic medals, finding the next Cadel Evans etc), safeguarding the integrity of sport (doping and sports gambling), and strengthening Australia’s sports industry (e.g. the future of the AIS et al)